Air passenger traffic keeps rising in Sweden

Passenger volumes in Sweden rising by 7% a month
More than 3 million people flew to or from one of Swedavia’s ten airports during November, a rise of 7% compared to the same month last year.
Both domestic and international traffic at Swedavia’s airports grew in November, to reach exactly 3,033,666 passengers. A total of 1,264,754 people flew domestically, up 6%, and 1,768,912 flew on international routes, up 8%.
Volume was up at all ten Swedish airports, from Malmö in the south to Kiruna in the north. The biggest growth in traffic was at Gothenburg’s Landvetter airport, up 15%, followed by Ronneby with a 10% traffic increase and Malmö with 9%.
At Stockholm Bromma the increase was 7%, and at the group’s biggest airport, Stockholm Arlanda, the number of passengers grew 5% in November to 1,812,916.
So far this year, more than 34,850,000 people have flown to or from one of Swedavia’s airports, up 5% on the January-November period in 2014.
TTG Nordic

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