Authority recommends remote control of planes

But such technology is unlikely to be developed any time soon
Following the Germanwings crash last month, a recommendation has been made for technology to be developed that would allow people on the ground to take remote control of a plane if it appears to go off course, and to land it safely.
Germany’s air traffic control authority Deutsche Flugsicherung wants the aviation industry to consider such technology. Data recordings show that on March 24, Germanwings pilot Andreas Lubitz deliberately locked the captain out of the cockpit and crashed the A320 into a mountainside, killing all 150 passengers and crew on board.
“We have to think past today’s technology,” Klaus Dieter Scheurle, head of Deutsche Flugsicherung, told journalists this week, though he admitted that such technology was unlikely to be developed any time in the next decade.
Reuters
[photo courtesy Air Traffic Controllers European Unions Coordination]

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