Lower tariffs on the horizon at CPH

Copenhagen Airport, Kastrup, CPH, buy, purchase, sell, stake, ATP, Macquarie, fund, state, tariff, tax, fares, lower

Changes are likely as Danish fund buys airport stake
A new shareholder at Copenhagen Airport may mean lower prices for both passengers and airlines in the future.
Such a move had been signalled back in May, but late on Wednesday the Australian capital fund Macquarie, which owns 26.9% of the shares in the airport, said it had sold its entire holding to Denmark’s ATP pension fund.
ATP paid around DKK 10 billion (€1.35 billion) for the shares – the biggest purchase it has ever made.
There is now speculation that, as politicians have been urging for some time, the airport could lower its tariffs to encourage cheaper fares for passengers and foster new routes. ATP is 39% owned by the Danish state.
Indeed, this is one of the reasons why Macquarie wanted to sell its investment, as the Danish state has increased its pressure to cut tariffs.
“It means a lot when companies are deciding where to have their headquarters. Is it accessible? Are there good flight connections?” said Brian Mikkelsen, business minister, in the summer. “That’s why we would like to see tariffs reduced in order to get more connections so it will cheaper to fly, both for ordinary people and for business.”
TV2 Nyheder / Copenhagen Post

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